When Movie Theaters Had Class

The distinctive architecture of movie theaters is now mostly a thing of the past.  Nikon D800, AF Nikkor 14mm f/2.8D ED.
The distinctive architecture of movie theaters is now mostly a thing of the past. Nikon D800, AF Nikkor 14mm f/2.8D ED.

Remember the old movie houses with their unique facades and the aroma of freshly-popped popcorn that spilled into the street?  I think most people in America over 30 do, but sadly, these architectural landmarks are growingly been converted into all sorts of venues, from clothing stores to  mini-shopping malls.  The phenomena could be a bit more pronounced in larger cities than in small-town America, but the trend has not been a good one for these venues for a long time.  That’s a pity, because the charm and feeling of these old structures will never be reproduced by today’s Megaplex theaters offering 16 to 24 movies under a single roof.

There seem to be many reasons for this gradual disappearance.  For starters, the paying customers that continue to go to movies obviously want choices, and lots of them.  Stadium seating where someone’s head in front of you is not blocking part of the screen?  Check.  Access to the latest movies on the first day of their release?  Check again.  Video game machines, ATM’s, and self-service ticket dispenser?  No problem.  Unfortunately, all of this comes at a price.  Don’t know about you, but I still love having to stand in line to buy a ticket from a person inside that colorful ticket booth.  And what about the flashing lights outside the theater at night?  Those are great too.  But more than that, these places have a kind of personality and character that modern concrete boxes can only dream of.  One single show every evening.  Why not?  After all, a little simplicity may just be what we all need in our über busy lives.