My Space, My Time

While for some people, alone time equates to loneliness, for others it is a moment of glorious solitude.
While for some people, alone time equates to unwanted loneliness, for others it is a moment of glorious solitude.
For too many, stepping away from it all does not necessarily mean disconnecting from the world at large.
For too many, stepping away from it all does not necessarily mean disconnecting from the world at large.
In our busy lives, where physical disconnection is not always possible, it is still possible to disappear into a world of thoughts.
In our busy lives, where physical disconnection is not always possible, it is still possible to disappear into a world of thoughts.
While cities are full of all sorts of external stimuli, they are also places with abundant empty streets.
While cities are full of all sorts of external stimuli, they are also places with abundant empty streets.
While not always the case, body language may have something to do with how approachable we all are at one point or another.
While not always the case, body language may have something to do with how approachable we all are at one point or another.

As I walk around all sorts of cities during my endless photo walkabouts, I can’t help but notice the sheer number of people I see alone. No, I’m not referring to the millions who go about their days moving from point A to point B as they go about their normal workdays, but rather I’m referring to those who are “really” alone, as if “I’m here all by myself” type of alone. So, unable to stop my mind from wondering what may be going through these solo souls’ minds during their personal walkabouts, I have begun to dwell on all sort of things relating to loneliness, companionship, and solitude. No, I’m not loosing my mind or plan to give up photography for psychiatry, but rather that when I’m alone out there (camera in hand), I always wonder whether my fellow lone riders are enjoying the “life less interrupted” as much as I am.

Our language has wisely sensed the two sides of being alone. It has created the word loneliness to express the pain of being alone. And it has created the word solitude to express the glory of being alone.” … Paul Tillich

From the little I can gather, it seems that people need as much time alone as they need the company of others. Call it a recharge, a moment to gather our thoughts, or whatever. And even when the line between loneliness and solitude is a blury one at best, somehow we all kind of know when we have crossed it. Ideally, that transition from one side of that undefined line to the other is a voluntary, and timely, one. That seems to be the implication of Tillich’s quote above. Choice, then, appears to be at the core of human ability to temporarily disengage, to fly alone, and to find meaning in the things around us. It is in that seemingly empty, yet rich space where we can get back to the basics of our humanity. And what emerges from that brief moment of solitude is a better person, a more fulfilled person, who’s time alone will make the company of others that much more enjoyable.

Napping In America

While most Americans frown on napping, it appears that the so-called power nap is alive and well in America.
While most Americans frown on napping, it appears that the so-called power nap is alive and well in America.
A population on the go will nap wherever they can, even if it is on hard surfaces on a city park.
A population on the go will nap wherever it can, even if it is on hard surfaces on a city park.

Do you nap?  If you are like most people, you probably won’t admit to it, even if you secretly grab a “z” or two throughout the day.  For some reason, the old siesta trend has never taken much of a hold in North America.  Coffee, mid-day power walks, and slacker phobias make sure that this doesn’t happen.  Where Europeans and Latin Americans see rest, people in the good-old USA see laziness.  Not that a little rest nap is less needed in the USA than any other place in the world, but rather that in the name of über-productivity, you are not getting paid to doze off while on the clock.  Oh, sure, you can chat all day at the office and waste time like the best of them while getting paid, but napping?  Just forget it.  But as these photos show, sleeping in public places may be a new, socially accepted trend in America.  For the modern worker, this could be a much-welcomed development.  Going out for lunch can now be combined with a quick power nap at a park bench.  No park benches where you hang out?  No problem.  Any flat, solid surface will do, as the only requirement seems to be that the surface be uncomfortable (which will send the message that you are not trying to get too comfortable).  Knee up or knee down?  I would recommend knee up because it conveys a more dynamic pose, which implies that while you are flat on your back, you do intend to get back to something productive soon.  Who knows, this may just be what you need to move your career to the next level.  What level will that be?  That I’ll leave to you to find out.

The Magic Of Great Halls

The majestic third floor hall at the National Portrait Gallery would give some castles in Europe a run for their money.
The majestic third floor hall at the National Portrait Gallery would give some castles in Europe a run for their money.

Don’t convince yourself that you need to travel to Old Europe to see some incredible architecture.  If you are curious enough, you can stick to some of your local attractions like this magnificent hall at the National Portrait Gallery.  Frankly, this photo doesn’t do the hallway justice, as the sheer magnitude and beauty of this colorful hall is simply stunning.  I guess when thinking about traveling is good to sometimes start thinking locally.