There Are Still Some Artisans Left

In a world consumed by mass production, it is always reassuring to encounter an artisan at work.
In a world consumed by mass production, it is always reassuring to encounter an artisan at work.

I never thought that the lonely, cutting sound of a small chisel would cause such a great impression on me.  After all, this is something we don’t hear or see every day.  A cold chisel being driven by gentle, patient hands into a granite wall with the methodical rhythm of someone who’s intent has more to do with achieving perfection than with worrying about time.  As I watched this artist work the stone I couldn’t help but think that this is the same level of patience and precision that goes into the making of top-end Leica cameras (which just happens to be what I used to take this photo).  For some people this is boring stuff, and no doubt watching an artisan’s slow, methodical work interspersed with numerous periods of silent observation is not everyone’s cup of tea.  For others, it is like watching a chess match by Grand Masters, where the long, tense silence is suddenly disrupted by a stroke of genius involving the subtle move of a chess piece to an adjacent square on the board.  Beauty lives in the very simplicity of the act.

Seeing In Black & White

Some photographers claim that they can see in black and while, but is there any truth to this?  Leica M9, Summicron-M 28mm f/2 ASPH.
Some photographers claim that they can see in black & white, but is there any truth to this? Leica M9, Summicron-M 28mm f/2 ASPH.

Let me start this post by saying that I love black & white photography.  Not that I have mastered this medium by any stretch of the imagination, but rather that I have come to realize that there are some scenes out there that come to life when shot on black & white.  In some strange way, the removal of color artifacts (or should I say, the substitution of these artifacts by different shades of grey) from the photograph kind of diminishes the judgmental interpretation of the photograph.  No longer can someone point out that the red shirt was not that red in the real world, or that blues look over-saturated.   When black & white photographs are involved, the observer tends to go through some sort of a mental shift as if being handed a different list of criteria by which to interpret the photograph.  Without ever having heard of Ansel Adam’s Zone System, these observers begin to interpret the photographs in terms of those grey variations that lie somewhere in between absolute white and absolute black.  What’s more, when black & white photography is involved, the whole notion of photographic composition seems to experience somewhat of a liberation to be analyzed without the distracting effect of color getting in the way.

But to what extent is the resulting photo the product of the photographer’s ability to “see” the scene in black & white prior to capturing it with his or her camera?  Is there such a thing as “seeing” in black & white when it comes to photography, or is it all the product of post-capture manipulation with today’s advanced software applications?  Frankly, I don’t have an answer to these questions, but I do venture to say that for most folks out there (and this includes your humble blogger here), playing with the software during post is where the action is.  We try this or that like a New York fashionista until voilà, we know it when we see it.  Having said that, I have no doubt that some talented photographers out there do have this ability uncanny ability to see in black & white.  At the very least, in they are able to see in grey variations, à la Ansel Adams.  For some, this gift will come natural; for others, no doubt the result of many years of photographic observation and practice.  Whatever the case, I am just glad that black & white photography is alive and well and that companies like Leica pay it tribute with the introduction of  such wonderful products as the Leica M Monochrome.  We can only hope that other companies follow in their footsteps.