The Urban Makeover

Sometimes you don't need a crowd to make a statement, whatever statement that happens to be.  Leica M 240, Summicron-M 50mm f/2.
Sometimes you don’t need a crowd to make a statement, whatever statement that happens to be. Leica M 240, Summicron-M 50mm f/2.

Lately I’ve been wondering about the “regular folk” cliche that keeps appearing in the media and our social daily social interactions.  Frankly, I’m not sure what that phrase means any more, as the more I look, the more eclectic we are becoming as a nation.  What’s more, this generational phenomena seems to be accentuated by the changes taking place between the looks of “city folk” and the people who live in non-urban areas.  Not that I am an expert at these things (but you can see the debate depicted by the Economist here), or qualified to be humanity’s judge.  Far from it.  But as I spend more time in the city, I’ve become growingly aware of these differences: the way people dress, the speed at which the move, the willingness to make eye contact, their ideas of neighborliness, their desire to go out at night, the cars they drive, and the overall way they carry themselves.  I now wish I could remember all those theories I studied in my Ecology course in college, but maybe I was not paying as much attention to this stuff back then.  The point is that for a lack of a better term, we all tend to become “aboriginals” in our own ecosystems, be it the city, the suburb, or the countryside.  That’s right, we all may have become “tribal” in one way or another.  So, in case the great Crocodile Dundee shows up and asks you what he asked Gus (“What tribe are you, Gus”), you better start thinking of an answer.