Daily Rituals Outside The Supreme Court

When a decision by the Supreme Court is imminent, journalists descend on the building waiting to grab anyone coming out of the building.
When a decision by the Supreme Court is imminent, journalists descend on the building waiting to grab anyone coming out of the building.
Winers and losers alike can't wait to hit the microphones outside the court to express either joy or disappointment with the Court's rulings.
Winners and losers alike can’t wait to hit the microphones outside the court to express either joy or disappointment with the Court’s rulings.
For TV crews, juggling between the Supreme Court and Congress is as simple as crossing the street.
For TV crews, juggling between the Supreme Court and Congress is as simple as crossing the street.
In the interest of timely reporting, journalists deploy tactical desks with wifi connectivity around the Capitol grounds.
In the interest of timely reporting, journalists deploy tactical desks with wifi connectivity around the Capitol grounds.

It has to be one of the busiest sidewalks in the world.  Sandwiched between the US Supreme Court building and 1st Street NE, this small piece of DC real estate is a constant beehive of activity whenever the Supreme Court is in session.  Journalists with tons of expensive gear wait impatiently for litigants to come down the Court’s stairs either to complain or celebrate after the Court issues a decision.  If the issue being litigated is controversial enough, you will also see (and hear) advocates from each side of the issue trying to out-demonstrate each other with bullhorns, placards, and mannequins.  Real estate is at a premium, though, and it is usually a sight to behold to watch journalists, demonstrators, and tourists with cameras jockeying for position along the relatively short space in front of the Court.  Some journalists (as you can see in the photo) opt to set mobile offices on the Capitol’s grounds, busily relaying news items to major networks from their shaded suites.  I guess if you have to be at the office on any given day, this is about as good as it can get in DC.  Chaos and calm, or what otherwise passes as a normal day in Washington’s charged political climate.

Military Veterans Storm The Monuments

After removing the last barriers at the Lincoln Memorial, a veteran insists in planting a flag as as high as he can.  Leica M240, Zeiss 35mm f/2 Biogon T* ZM.
After removing the last barriers at the Lincoln Memorial, a veteran insists in planting a flag as as high as he can. Leica M240, Zeiss 35mm f/2 Biogon T* ZM.
War veterans from as far back as the Second World War showed up to support the opening of the nation's war memorials.  Leica M240, Zeiss 35mm f/2 Biogon T* ZM.
War veterans from as far back as the Second World War showed up to support the opening of the nation’s war memorials. Leica M240, Zeiss 35mm f/2 Biogon T* ZM.
During the demonstration, Park Police were everywhere, but always maintained their composure.  Leica M240, Zeiss 35mm f/2 Biogon T* ZM.
During the demonstration, Park Police were everywhere, but always maintained their composure. Leica M240, Zeiss 35mm f/2 Biogon T* ZM.
Only a brief scuffle took place when veterans started removing the remaining barriers at the Lincoln Memorial.  Leica M240, Zeiss 35mm f/2 Biogon T* ZM.
Only a brief scuffle took place when veterans started removing the remaining barriers at the Lincoln Memorial. Leica M240, Zeiss 35mm f/2 Biogon T* ZM.
A veteran carries one of the barriers away while a local Park Ranger tries to ignore him.  Leica M240, Zeiss 35mm f/2 Biogon T* ZM.
A veteran carries one of the barriers away while a local Park Ranger tries to ignore him. Leica M240, Zeiss 35mm f/2 Biogon T* ZM.
A silent statement was made by a double-amputee veteran.  Leica M240, Zeiss 35mm f/2 Biogon T* ZM.
A silent statement was made by a double-amputee veteran. Leica M240, Zeiss 35mm f/2 Biogon T* ZM.

There is a phenomena that regularly takes place in Washington, DC that is perhaps rare in other parts of the country.  To put it as simply as I can, it goes like this: as the bureaucrats leave the District for the weekend, the protesters move in to occupy its streets.  The movement in and out of the capital resembles the movement of the waves, where the ocean must first recede before waves come back to the shore in force.  Such was the case this weekend when thousands of military veterans stormed the DC Mall’s memorials to make the point that citizens should never be denied access to our nation’s monuments.  From what my camera could see from the middle of the crowd, it all took place in an orderly (albeit sometimes tense) fashion.  Only one brief scuffle took place at the Lincoln Memorial when some of the veterans insisted in taking a section of a barrier from the hands of a Park Police Officer, but after some shoving took place and a nightstick made its appearance, everyone seemed to calm down.  But as better heads prevailed, the barriers were removed (to be dumped later in front of the White House) and the crowd made its way up the Lincoln Memorial.  It wasn’t exactly the liberation of France, but it was readily obvious the nation’s veterans know a thing or two about breaking down barriers and occupying the high ground, no matter the cost.  The days when they wore the uniform may be long gone, but you wouldn’t known from the way so many of them dragged their once able bodies to keep pace with their younger brethren on their way to bring down those metal barriers.  I’m sure that President Lincoln, sitting there looking at all that was taking place at his feet today, was probably repeating some of his most famous words to the nation’s veterans: “Be sure you put your feet in the right place, then stand firm.”  And that’s what they did, Mr. President.