Why Not Lancaster?

Lancaster Central Market

Some attractions never get the amount of publicity they deserve. That seems to be the case with American central markets. You see, I am convinced that food is culture, and you simply cannot experience the culture of any country unless you experience their food and the social interactions that takes place around the local tables and the people who make it all possible. And if there’s a place to experience the local culture, it has to be in those unique, historical markets that dot the landscape everywhere from Istanbul to the colorful street markets of Asia. That certainly includes the many farmer markets of America, of which the oldest in existence (dating back to the 1730’s) is the colorful Lancaster Central Market in Pennsylvania.

While not as large as the Reading Terminal Market in Philadelphia, the somewhat reduced size gives the Lancaster Market a little less of a commercial feeling, which translates into a somewhat more personal experience. And yes, the Amish are there with their wonderful fruit and baked goods offerings, but to my surprise, so are the Puerto Ricans, with their pulled pork and rice and beans. Nevertheless, it is the proximity to what one local described as the “bionic soil” of the old Amish farmland that makes the Lancaster Market so special. Drive along the luscious, winding farm hills of such towns as Strasburg, Paradise, and Intercourse (it really exists) and you will soon realize what makes this part of the country such a natural treasure. Stop by a local farm and try their home made Root Beer and jams, and you will regret not living closer to the area. I’ve always associated the state of Pennsylvania with great food, but after visiting the Lancaster area, I am elevating the state a few notches on my scale of places to visit any time you can. After all, food is culture, and as a self-appointed culture seeker, it is high time I become more cultured, so here I go.

 

If It’s Sunday, It Must Be The Market

Cutting Fruit
Local markets present a great opportunity to taste products before buying them. [Click photos for larger versions]
Chives
When was the last time you had a chance to talk to the actual producer at a supermarket?
Pancakes
It may not be fancy, but these loaded pancakes will guarantee that you won’t leave hungry.
Bread Shopping
The great variety of artisanal bread at the Dupont Circle market are reason alone to be there every Sunday.

Every year after the 4th of July celebrations in Washington, DC, a sort of lethargy descends on the locals. Not that this is a character trait, mind you, but rather that after all the fireworks and concerts (not to mention the terrorist threats) people are kind of spent. This year, not even the weather was adding any cheers to the weekend, as storms forced the evacuation of the National Mall hours before the concert and fireworks were about to start. Talk about damper.

But if there’s something you can always count on during summer weekends, it is the myriad of seasonal farmer markets that come-hell-or-high-water, will be there to sell their products. The region is blessed when it comes to farmers and produce. Vendors from Maryland, Pennsylvania, and Virginia descend on DC every weekend bringing such variety of products that they often leave these city slickers dumfounded. And then there’s the Chesapeake Bay, with a seafood bounty that could even impress the folks from the Deadliest Catch in Alaska.

But when it comes to rarity, there’s one product that always challenges the best of them: artisanal bread. Who would’ve known that we have so many great artisanal bakeries (and even patisseries) in the tristate region. When I lived in the suburbs I could’ve sworn they had been rendered illegal. Bread came from the supermarket, mass produced and with enough preservatives to guarantee that future archeologists could still eat it 1,000 years from now. Luckily, there’s still hope, an local farmer markets are giving these emerging bakeries some well-deserved exposure. My waistline awaits their renaissance.

 

Meandering Through Hong Kong

Old and new are in full display along the magestic Victoria Harbor in Hong Kong.
Old and new are in full display along the magestic Victoria Harbor in Hong Kong.
One of the many hidden gems in the Central region of Hong Kong is a small sitting park just a few blocks from Queen's Road Central.
One of the many hidden gems in the Central region of Hong Kong is a small sitting park just a few blocks from Queen’s Road Central.
A few blocks from the Star Ferry Terminal in Tsim Sha Tsui sits one of the greatest tributes to Shakespeare you'll find anywhere in the world.
A few blocks from the Star Ferry Terminal in Tsim Sha Tsui sits one of the greatest tributes to Shakespeare you’ll find anywhere in the world.
The view from inside the Star Ferry Terminal in Hong Kong Island.
The view from inside the Star Ferry Terminal in Hong Kong Island.
Restaurants in Hong Kong are everywhere, but if you dig a little, you will be rewarded with some great, off-the-beaten-path finds.
Restaurants in Hong Kong are everywhere, but if you dig a little, you will be rewarded with some great, off-the-beaten-path finds.
Old fish markets sit side-by-side with modern Hong Kong in the Central area near Hollywood Road.
Old fish markets sit side-by-side with modern Hong Kong in the Central area near Hollywood Road.
Shiny new buildings provide an imposing backdrop to a myriad of small, traditional markets in Hong Kong.
Shiny new buildings provide an imposing backdrop to a myriad of small, traditional markets in Hong Kong.
The relentless fast pace of life in Hong Kong does take its toll on the locals.
The relentless fast pace of life in Hong Kong does take its toll on the locals.
The intricate lift machinery at Victoria Peak makes sure the historical tram makes it up the steep mountain without a glitch.
The intricate lift machinery at Victoria Peak makes sure the historical tram makes it up the steep mountain without a glitch.
One of the many quaint establishments along the hillside Hollywood Street in Central.
One of the many quaint establishments along the hillside Hollywood Street in Central.
A visitor takes in the view of Victoria Harbor, undoubtedly one of the most scenic places on earth.
A visitor takes in the view of Victoria Harbor, undoubtedly one of the most scenic places on earth.

As the pilot announced our descent to the Hong Kong airport, images of an exotic, long-lost world kept creeping into my mind.  I kept thinking of 1841 and the first Opium Wars that led to the British acquisition of Hong Kong under the 1842 Treaty of Nanking as if it were yesterday.  I guess some part of me wanted to walk back into that world to witness the chaotic, yet exciting period of discovery and adventure in history.  It is as if Hong Kong (at least for me) made more sense by looking backwards than looking forward.  Unjustly as it may sound, it was the city’s past that fascinated me more than its future.  This feeling didn’t last long, for as soon as I debarked the aircraft and came face-to-face with Hong Kong’s slick, shiny airport and its modern airport express train, a new, futuristic concept of the city entered my consciousness.  Maybe it was the city’s crowded streets full of hastily moving people, or maybe the incredible heaven-reaching architecture surrounding Victoria Harbor that refocused my attention to the future.  Not sure.  But one thing is undeniable the moment you set foot in Hong Kong: that this is a vibrant, energetic city being driven into the 21st Century by an eager, youth-centered population bent on making its mark on the world stage.  The city’s energy could be felt everywhere, and it was quite contagious.

But to say that Hong Kong has moved on from its past would be overstating the fact.  Along with its shinny new high-rise buildings, a myriad of traditional, old-world markets line its narrow streets and alleyways.  This is specially the case on Hong Kong Island and the Central sector of the city, where you will walk past a majestic, modern building just to come face-to-face with a street restaurant that does all its cooking right there on a street kitchen.  Venture to either side of the longest electric escalator in the world, the Central Mid-Levels staircase, and you will soon find yourself a century back in time amidst butcher shops and street vendors selling everything from Mao’s little red book to elaborate jade jewelry.  And when crossing the imposing Victoria Harbor to visit the famous Tsim Sha Tsui district (and Bruce Lee’s famous statute along the Avenue of Stars), you will have your choice of either riding the ultra-modern city metro system or the historic Star Ferry across the bay.  Old and new, side-by-side, against a backdrop that you will not find anywhere else in the world.  As I boarded the plane for my return trip to America, I realized that Hong Kong had showed me that the future only makes sense in relation to the past.  As the city wrestles with its place in the world in a new century, it seems to find its safe footing in that long-gone colonial past.  Like an alchemist, it continues to blend its many potions in the hope that something new and exciting results from its many efforts.  If you ask me, I think that this old alchemist is up to something great.

Progress? A City Lets An Old Market Die

The dilapidated condition of the old Florida Avenue Market reflects the city's policy of "out with the old and in with the new."
The dilapidated condition of the old Florida Avenue Market reflects the city’s policy of “out with the old and in with the new.”
Vendors who had been occupying the old buildings have been gradually moving to other parts of the market so buildings can be available for renovation.
Vendors  have been gradually moving out to other parts of the market so buildings can be available for renovation.
With the gradual displacement of vendors, a certain character of the old neighborhood is rapidly disappearing.
With the gradual displacement of vendors, a certain character of the old neighborhood is rapidly disappearing.
Walking the abandoned streets of the old market, you can easily imagine what it must have looked like during its heyday.
Walking the abandoned streets of the old market, you can easily imagine what it must have looked like during its heyday.
Most of the old market has already disappeared, taking with it the character that gave the place its unique stature in Washington, DC.
Most of the old market has already disappeared, taking with it the character that gave the place its unique stature in Washington, DC.

Not sure whether it was nostalgia or mere curiosity, but I couldn’t resist the impulse to go and photograph the old Florida Avenue Market (or Union Market, as it is commonly known today) one last time before it disappears forever.  No wrecking crews there yet, but there is no doubt that major developers in the area are already salivating at the mouth about the money they will make when this part of Washington, DC is finally brought to the 21st Century, so to speak.  Not that progress in of itself is a bad thing, mind you, but rather that it is not clear at this point how much of the old market’s character is to be retained and how much of the new development will make the area undistinguishable from so many other developments in the area.  In talking to one of the displaced butchers yesterday, it was obvious that he was lamenting the magnitude of change in the area and the upscale transformation of the market.  I can’t help but share some of his sentiments, as I was kind of fond of visiting the cavernous warehouse businesses where all sorts of products from Africa, the Caribbean, and Asia were on sale by immigrants with heavy accents, but whose rhythmic sale chants were exotic melodies to my ears.  A bit rough, a bit chaotic, but a place like no other in the area.  As it disappears in the name of progress and modernism, I can only wonder whether I’ll ever hear again those imagination-inducing, linguistic melodies that so easily transported me to those far-away markets around the world.  I’m afraid progress has its very unique way of dealing with those voices.