The Quick Shot

Metro Rider

Like most photographers out there, I too spend endless hours looking for that perfect shot. And when I say perfect, I don’t mean that literally, but rather in the context of being able to stand out a little from the crowd of shots we regularly find in places like Instagram and Flickr. The sad thing is that no matter how much I try (and perhaps I’m speaking here for most wandering photographers), those photographs that elicit comments of the “you should take more pictures like this,” are very hard to find indeed. No doubt this is the result of multiple factors, from your timing as a photographer, your choice of venue, or the simple fact that not much is really happening around you. Whatever the case, the point is that while personal photographic and geographic choices have a lot to do with it, luck (yes, that same old variable) has a lot to do with it too. That is why photographers out there (myself included) look like human versions of 360-degree radars. We look right, left, behind us, up, down, and everywhere. We do this while crossing the streets, walking by a construction site, while drinking coffee, wherever. You can imagine the thoughts that cross people’s minds in a city like Washington, DC that is replete with intrigue and spies everywhere. Who is this person with a camera checking everything out and taking photos from weird angles? He looks Russian to me. Yes, that’s pretty much the thought pattern, but in reality what we photographers are after is that quick shot, that unique moment in time that make all those walked miles worthwhile. And that is the story of the shot above. Many hours and sore feet later, this scene revealed itself to me as I was headed for the metro and the comforts of home. My last shot of the day, and like they say in golf, the one that keeps you coming back, again and again, to the unpredictable streets of your city.

Seeing Differently By Adjusting Your Visual Gyroscope

Sometimes all it takes to see things differently is to climb a set of stairs and look down.
Sometimes all it takes to see things differently is to climb a set of stairs and then proceed to look down.
Using a different lens could lead to new and creative ways of seeing in the urban environment.
Using a different lens could lead to new and creative ways of seeing in the urban environment.
Common urban scenes familiar to most folks can prove to be quite interesting if observed from a different perspective.
Common urban scenes familiar to most folks can prove to be quite interesting if observed from a different perspective.
Curved lines will always add a different architectural perspective to the landscape.
Curved lines will always add a different architectural perspective to the landscape.
A lone and otherwise insignificant street lamp acquires a new personality as a result of empty space.
A lone and otherwise insignificant street lamp acquires a new personality as a result of empty space.

There is something to be said for purposefully changing the way we see. Not that there’s anything wrong with the “panning field of view” approach that characterizes the way we see most things on a daily basis.  Rather, the point is that within all those daily panoramas there are endless opportunities to adjust our visual gyroscopes in order to add a little spark to our visual enjoyment of life.  This take on our visual world is nothing new. After all, most people already do this, albeit somewhat unconsciously.  It happens whenever they adjust their positions to “get a better view,” or when they take the elevator to an observation deck in order to see the world around them from a different vantage point. Something deep inside us all gives rise to the desire for visual adjustment, and whether it is the result of simple curiosity or much deeper emotions, it nevertheless represents a transition from a less-fulfilling state to a more fulfilling one. It is positive energy at its best, and we all know that we could use a lot more of that.

Seeing differently, however, does not come without some effort. Just like it is imperative to climb a set of stairs before enjoying a view, there are some stairs to climb when adjusting the way we see in that crazy world around us.  But what really matters in the end is that the rewards of such climbs are incredibly satisfying.  They just take a “change in latitude,” like the common saying says.  The few photographs on this week’s post are the result of some of those changes in latitude–simple attempts to see the familiar differently.  As if out of nowhere, the old became new, and the familiar revealed itself in a brand new light.  I immediately came to the realization that these scenes were there all the time for someone to see them, provided that someone took the time to look.

 

NoMa: An Emerging Neighborhood

Like so many other DC neighborhoods, the existence of a busy metro stop is key to NoMa's urban resurgence and gentrification.
Like so many other DC neighborhoods, the existence of a busy metro stop is key to NoMa’s urban resurgence and gentrification.
NoMa's construction facelift is bringing a whole slew of trendy new condos to the area.
NoMa’s construction facelift is bringing a whole slew of trendy new condos to the area.
Walking east under the NoMa underpass is like walking into another world where urban renewal has yet to reach the community.
Walking east under the NoMa underpass is like walking into another world where urban renewal has yet to reach the community.
NoMa's well built and clearly marked bicycle paths are the best in the District of Columbia.
NoMa’s well built and clearly marked bicycle paths are the best in the District of Columbia.
Mint, an excellent Indian-Pakistani restaurant next to the sleek Marriott Courtyard hotel, is one of the reasons to visit NoMa.
Mint, an excellent Indian-Pakistani restaurant next to the sleek Marriott Courtyard hotel, is one of the reasons to visit NoMa.
NoMa's proximity to the popular Union Market scene makes it an incredible location for those looking to getting in early into a great neighborhood.
NoMa’s proximity to the popular Union Market scene make it an incredible find for hipsters in search of the next great neighborhood.

Ever heard of NoMa?  Don’t blame you, as most people wonder whether the acronym stands for some sort of medical condition.  But if there’s a neighborhood that is on its way up (and I mean way up), it is NoMa, or what is otherwise known to non-hipsters as North of Massachusetts Avenue in Washington, DC.  The neighborhood is still work in progress, but with its spacious metro stop (NoMa-Gallaudet Station) and proximity to Union Market (the hottest market in town), the area will no doubt have a great future as a place to live and work.  Three significant employers are smack in the middle of the neighborhood: the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATF), National Public Radio (NPR), and the DC facilities of SiriusXM Radio.  Add to this a public wi-fi network, clean streets, and a whole slew of small, affordable restaurants, and you can’t help but be impressed with this up-and-coming neighborhood.  It won’t remain undiscovered for long.

Public Servants You Can’t Help But Like

Right outside Metro stations downtown Washington, DC you will find some of the friendliest and most helpful public servants in the city.
Right outside Metro stations downtown Washington, DC you will find some of the friendliest and most helpful public servants in the city.

Rain or shine, you see them outside many downtown Metro stops, reading maps with tourists and pointing in every direction possible.  They are the men and women in red and blue, Metro employees who’s friendly attitude and willingness to assist visitors with whatever they need puts them in direct contrast with local bureaucrats who buzz right past you without even noticing whether you’re still breathing.  Because of their uniforms, some people may think they are security officers, but take the time to talk to them and you’ll find some of the nicest people you will encounter anywhere inside the Beltway.  Washingtonians who actually look forward to talking to you, who would’ve known.

Don’t You Love The Metro?

You never know what you will see in the metro, but one thing is for sure: it is always amusing.  Leica M9, Summicron-M 28mm f/2 ASPH.
You never know what you will see in the metro, but one thing is for sure: it is always amusing. Leica M9, Summicron-M 28mm f/2 ASPH.

I know, I know, too many photos of the metro.  The thing is that no matter how much I use the metro, the scenes I keep finding in some of these rides never cease to amaze me.  In this case some creative photography students from George Mason University were recording people’s reactions to this model.  You can’t see it in the photograph, but the model’s friends were a few rows back with their camera phones watching and filming as if in some anthropological study.  This was a great idea, even if I cannot remember what the specific project was all about.  The funny thing was that after talking to the model for a few seconds and capturing this photo, I too began to get into this whole “reaction” thing.  As you can imagine (and this being the DC area), people went to great lengths to look, but while pretending not to look (lots of optical nerves strained on this day).  In fact, while I was there, just about everyone that entered the metro merely went past the model without ever addressing her in any way.  That is, if you don’t count those quick glances characteristic of people who have just seen something that they were not supposed to see.  I would have loved to have seen their final project report.  In a city where political back-stabbing, taxation, and political opportunism are the stuff of everyday life, it was nice to see that someone was still having some fun.