The Connected Disconnected

Ignored Look

Like just about every day, I went walking today with my camera. When I do this, I typically bury my cell phone somewhere in my camera bag where it is very hard to access. I do this because I’ve come to realize that the whole purpose of being outside is to see and feel what’s going on around me. I want to disconnect from electronics and connect with the world that keeps on moving in spite of our interest in joining it. Perhaps this is a photographer thing, but I don’t think so.  More than that, it is a fascination with a world that is alive and in motion, a world where glances still hold unspeakable mystery, and where human energy continues to create all things wonderful and all things bad. Humans, in all their shapes, forms, and behaviors are the stuff of life.

That is why it is so hard to positive spin on the modern phenomena of the connected disconnected. The being there in society, but not there at the same time. Like the young man in the photo above, to be actively linked to the faraway world via a cell phone, but totally uninterested in the the world that sits just a few feet away. Connected, but disconnected. A statement about our modern digital generation, I guess. But perhaps, if he would have only glanced up from the screen for a moment like she did to make eye contact, a whole new world connections would have been possible. They shall never know, for at no time did he raise his eyes in her direction. Connected, disconnected. A new form of normal.

Better Uphill Than Downhill

uphill

Lately I’ve talked to a few folks that seem somewhat morose about everything that’s going on around them. You could actually see the burden on their shoulders, not to mention their cautious, hesitant steps. It is as if this hyperactive world is finally beating them down, leading to conversations long on medical tests and anxiety about a world that has seemingly gone mad. Too many travel warnings, too many terrorists, too many lying politicians, too many medications, and too little time to live a little. It’s all kind of depressing, to tell you the truth, and if you let these worries get into your head, it won’t be long before you convince yourself that life is nothing but a mad dash downhill to the end of the road. What’s so fun about that?

The antidote to all this is nothing less than focusing on always going uphill, rather than downhill. That’s right, struggle more, not less. Celebrate your ignorance, because there will be so much more to learn, but do get on with it. Look in front of you and plan your next move, be it learning something difficult or doing something challenging. Get rid of negative talk and fix your eyes on the hill ahead, no matter how high it is. Look at the stars above and not at the dirt below. Live for the joy of living, and never take that dreaded downhill road. Others have tried that route, only to discover that it leads nowhere. So cheer up, look up, and push up that hill with gusto, because it is along that road where great things always happen.

A Little Street Photography Therapy

The corner of 7th St NW and E St NW is a perfect location for people watching. [Click photo for larger version]
The corner of 7th St NW and E St NW is a perfect location for people watching. [Click photo for larger version]
Everyone seems to have a sunny disposition before a long weekend.
Everyone seems to have a sunny disposition before a long weekend.
You know it is a perfect day when the tables make their way outside.
You know it is a perfect day when the tables make their way outside.
Even during perfect spring days, not everyone can afford to lay out in the sun.
Even during perfect spring days, not everyone can afford to lay out in the sun.

You know those days when no matter how hard you try, it is virtually impossible to come up with any great idea for a photographic project? Well, today was one of those days. Nothing there. So as I have done so many times in the past when I am in desperate need of some photographic therapy, I grabbed my camera and out I went. I figured that a little street photography would do me some good by clearing up the Friday photographic fog. No plans, just random walking for as long as my feet could stand it. I’m glad I went out, thought, because everyone seemed to be in a good mood in this otherwise grumpy city. No doubt the Friday “I’m out of here” thing was beginning to sink in or something, but more likely it was the effect of a perfect spring day before a long holiday weekend. Whatever it was, it was definitely contagious. Over six miles of walking with my camera, a very enjoyable culinary visit to several of the local food trucks, and a quick stop for some liquid therapy at the bar in Jaleo, and everything was well with the universe once more. A great day after all.

 

To Hover Is To See: Images From Two City Blocks

This gentleman was looking away, but waiting for him to turn around produced the desired photograph. [Click photo to enlarge]
This gentleman was looking away, but waiting for him to turn around produced the desired photograph. [Click photo to enlarge]
Couples in love will always be great subjects to photograph. [Click photo to enlarge]
Couples in love will always be great subjects to photograph. [Click image to enlarge]
Rare as it may be, there's always plenty of public romance in our cities. [Click to enlarge]
Rare as it may be, there’s always plenty of public romance in our cities. [Click image to enlarge]
Candid moments are simply the best, provided you learn to anticipate the scene. [Click for larger image]
Candid moments are simply the best, provided you learn to anticipate the scene. [Click image to enlarge]
Sometimes the secret is to see the image amongst all the environmental noise surrounding it. [Click image to enlarge]
Sometimes the secret is to see the image amongst all the environmental noise surrounding it. [Click image to enlarge]
 

Recently, I bumped into a local photographer friend of mine who happened to be hanging around an icy puddle of slush on a Washington, DC downtown corner.  Noticing that he was kind of hovering around the area with his Leica rangefinder at the ready, it was obvious that he was waiting for something to happen, so I asked him how it was going.  Without taking his eyes away from that puddle of slush for more than a second, he told me that he was waiting for the “decisive moment” when someone would hop over the puddle so he could capture it a la Cartier-Bresson.  To say he was working the scene would be an understatement.  Dodging people and nature while constantly shifting his position, he appeared to be moving with the grace of a Mohamed Ali within the confined amount of space allowed by a busy sidewalk.  I don’t know if he ever got his picture, but if he didn’t, it was certainly not for lack of trying.

Working a scene is what appears to be at the root of any great photograph.  When we look at some of the unbelievable photographs made by National Geographic photographers, what makes these photographs so special to a large extent is the unique perspective from which they were captured.  Composition, angle of view, and masterly handling of light are not things that happen by chance.  At that level, lots of considerations go into a photographer’s choices before that shutter is finally pressed, and luck, while always welcomed, has nothing to do with it in the vast majority of cases.  It is visual decision-making at its best: when to hang tight, when to move, when to aim, when to shift left or right, when to squat, or climb a building–they are all the product of intense observation and quick reaction, even if the end result is to stand still and wait.  While not perfect in any way, every single photo on this blog today was made possible by the simple act of waiting. Waiting for the cigar-smoking gentleman to look at me, waiting for the couples to show some tenderness, waiting for the grandfather to strike a teaching pose at the museum, and waiting for the waiter to approach the window.  Waiting, and anticipating.  Some may call this luck, and no doubt there’s some truth to the fact that the subjects could have acted otherwise, but the old saying, “The more I practice, the luckier I get,” may also have something to do with it.  Learning to see, combined with the patience that so often rewards anticipation, will pay great visual dividends after the shutter is pressed.  So after hanging around two downtown blocks for an entire afternoon on a very cold day, here’s the photographic lesson that was reinforced in my mind: that it is OK to run when you have to, but when you don’t, then don’t. Great things may happen when you allow your eyes the time to do what they do best: to see.

 

Of Hunters And Romantics

While photographic micro-scenes are everywhere, it sometimes takes a lot of work, and patience, to find them.
While photographic micro-scenes are everywhere, it sometimes takes a lot of work, and patience, to find them.
A totally-relaxed woman reads the newspaper front pages at the Newseum in downtown Washington, DC.
A totally-relaxed woman reads the newspaper front pages at the Newseum in downtown Washington, DC.
An obviously tired woman catches a catnap at the National Gallery of Art's courtyard.
An obviously tired woman catches a catnap at the National Gallery of Art’s courtyard.

Just about every street photographer you talk to these days is in pursuit of that elusive, candid moment when people are just being themselves, oblivious to anyone around them.  The less romantic interpretation of this search has been equated by some to a “hunt,” which I guess alludes to a photographer’s self-perception as a chaser of some sort, always at the ready with a camera and with the index finger on the trigger (or shutter release in this case).  Conversely, there is also a somewhat more romantic version of this street photography process.  This particular version (which we will call romantic for lack of a better term) alludes to the search for endless, small moments of human expression which take place every day in every city around the world.  At its core it refers to the desire to look for these fleeting moments in order to capture them in a photograph for all humanity to experience.  These different artistic approaches have lately left me wondering whether they are nothing but mere “distinctions without a difference,” or whether the street photographers who fall in either one of these categories are indeed different creatures practicing different forms of photography.

Arguably, a hunt conjures notions of finality, of a limited lifespan with a discernible beginning and an end.  At some level it implies that the relationship between the photographer and the subject is that of a pursuer and prey, with the final moment of capture crowning a day’s achievement by the mere act of having completed the capture.  What’s more, it would appear as if any talk of a hunt places the photographer at a different playing field as that of the subject of the hunt, as if referring to different realities that by definition have produced two very different, and distinct characters.  One is a chaser, the other the object of a chase.

In contrast, the romantic photographer doesn’t see the world this way.  For him or her it’s all about evoking human emotion in perpetuity, a desire to share what unfolded before his or her eyes for only a brief moment in the endless continuum of time.  These special moments are as random as they are unique, with only a split second decision standing as a stoic arbiter between moments that will be forgotten by history and moments that will be frozen for eternity.  That incredible visual zenith in an unfolding scene is what they live for.  For them, that “moment” like no other–the never-again visual second standing between immortality and oblivion.  It’s dramatic briefness renders it almost impossible to record on a regular basis, but the seemingly impossible odds will never stop the romantic street photographer.  On the contrary, they are the source of his or her passion–a passion which most will define by a handful of incredible “moments” captured over the course of a year out of the tens of thousands of photographs taken and thousands of miles walked during that year. Crazy? Perhaps, but not for that incurable romantic with a camera.

So next time you go out with your camera in search of those special, human moments that will visually reward you for the rest of your life, consider whether you will approach them as a hunter or as a romantic.  Will you just watch a scene unfold before you from a distant, vantage point, or will you make yourself part of that scene in order to feel the pulse and rhythm of the human drama taking place right before your very eyes.  Whatever you do, it bears remembering that you, the photographer, is what matters.  The camera is merely the equivalent of a painter’s brush, an instrument by which to translate your creativity onto a canvas that others can see.  In the end, it all boils down to the tireless pursuit of that short-lived moment in a scene when your eyes, your camera, and the strumming beatings of your heart line up in perfect harmony.  It is as rare as seeing a comet, but just as rewarding.

 

What Occupies Us

There appears to be some truth to the fact that what occupies us most of the time defines who we are as a person.
Some would argue that what occupies you most of the time may define who you are as a person.
Admittedly, some activities may be more helpful than others in determining what makes a particular person click.
Admittedly, some activities may be more helpful than others in determining what makes a particular person click.
It is entirely possible that what occupies a person most of the time may not be a true reflection of who that person believes he or she is.
It is entirely possible that what occupies a person most of the time may not be a true reflection of who that person believes he or she is.

 

Recently, I came across a quote by Carl Jung, the famous Swiss psychiatrist and psychotherapist, that got me thinking about the things we say and the things we do.  What made this quote even more puzzling for me was that it came in stark contrast with something I read in one of my favorite books of all times, “Cassanova In Bolzano,” by the famous Hungarian author Sándor Márai.  The contrast between Carl Jung (a realist) and Cassanova (an idealist) could not be more stark.

Let’s start with Carl Jung. The quote I’m referring to goes as follows:

 

You are what you do, not what you say you’ll do.

 

Jung could not be more blunt.  A waiter, then, is just a waiter and not a writer.  An office worker is an office worker, and there’s no use describing him or her as a painter.  If you have a great voice, but don’t sing professionally, then you are definitely not a singer, according to Jung.  No room for dreamers here, or for trying to convince anyone that you are really an artist trapped in the daily toil required to put food on the table.  Plain and simple, no amount of talk, of dreaming, or wishful thinking will change what is obvious for everyone to see.  A harsh reality indeed, but Jung obviously called them like he saw them.

And then, there was Sándor Márai, telling us through his character Cassanova that what you do does not necessarily defines who you are.  That you, in your hearts of hearts, could be a painter even if you’ve never painted anything.  That what defines a writer is not the product of his or her labor, but rather the poetry that forms inside his or her heart.  What we think we are is what we are, not what the trappings of life and circumstance have forced upon us.

In his book, Cassanova is somewhat annoyed by his assistant (Balbi) questioning why he called himself a writer if he had never written anything, or gotten paid for it for that matter.  For Cassanova, his life was, in a sense, his writing.  It was just that he had yet to put it down to pen and paper:

 

… I am that rare creature, a writer with a life to write about! You asked me how much I have written? … Not much, I admit… I have been envoy, priest, soldier, fiddler, and doctor of civil and canonical law… But that’s not the point, it’s not the writing, it’s what I have done that matters. It is me, my life, that is the important thing. The point … is that being is much more difficult than doing… When I have lived, I shall want to write.

 

It would have been an event to remember to hear Carl Jung and Sándor Márai discussing this contrasting philosophies.  I can’t help but think that at times I’ve found myself fervently ascribing to one of these camps or the other.  That is why photographs like the ones above make me think so much about the nature of people, or at least, the nature of the people depicted on the photos.  Who are these people?  Are they what I see, or is there something more to them (perhaps their true nature) that is hidden from my eyes?

Unbeknownst to me, about a month ago I was standing precisely on the line of demarcation between these contrasting approaches.  Upon visiting one of the major art galleries in Washington, DC (will not mention names here in the name of privacy) and walking down one of the empty, yet beautiful corridors, I came face-to-face with one of the security employees who hangs around the hallways making sure no harm comes to the artwork at the gallery.  What my eyes saw was a security guard doing his job, and one that at first impression, did not look like a very exciting one.  After a short conversation I discovered that he and his family had come to this country in search of the safety that they could not find back home in their African country.  More than that, he confided that he had run for President back home and lost, but that it remained his dream to go back and try again when the conditions were right.  He also gave me a short lesson in African economics and development, and all without me ever asking.  Obviously, there was a longing in his heart and a vision of the role he felt he was meant to play in his life.  I was just surprised at the trick my eyes had played on me.  Now looking back at this experience, I can only wonder whether Jung and Márai, had they been in my position, would have seen the same man in front of them.  The eyes, after all, can be quite deceiving.

 

A Little Street Verticality

When composing photographs, orienting your camera vertically will product a totally different mood.
When composing photographs, orienting your camera vertically will product a totally different mood.
Shooting vertically will eliminate most of the environmental setting in a photograph.
Shooting vertically will eliminate most of the environmental setting in a photograph.
Shooting vertically adds a little compositional challenge by severely limiting the cropping options.
Shooting vertically adds a little compositional challenge by severely limiting the cropping options.
The vertical effect is dramatically enhance by the presence of similarly oriented structures.
The vertical effect is dramatically enhance by the presence of similarly oriented structures.
Going tight with your shot, as opposed to wide, give a natural telephoto effect to a photograph.
Going tight with your shot, as opposed to wide, give a natural telephoto effect to a photograph.

Yesterday, I decided to have a little fun with my Leica. After all, with the cold, flu-inducing weather refusing to leave us alone for the season, it occurred to me that what I needed was a little lighthearted photo day. My goal: to do a little tribute to the famous Leica photographer Ralph Gibson. This name may not mean much to those who are not Leica fanatics photographers, but to those who are, Mr. Gibson is somewhat of a Dalai Lama figure in the Leica community. When he talks, people listen. And his talking is mostly done through the lens of a Leica camera.

But why Ralph Gibson? The answer is that contrary to just about everyone I have come in contact with in the photographic community, Mr. Gibson is known (among many other things) for mastering the “vertical” photographic style. The world may be busy taking photos with a horizontal orientation (which admittedly allows for lots of forgiving cropping), but Mr. Gibson is a master of the vertical world, and has been for as long, long time. Easy? Not really. After a day of shooting only vertically to see what this would feel like, all I can say is that not only is this approach ergonomically hard, but it is also compositionally challenging. At the end of the day I felt I had gone through an entire paradigm change in my approach to photography. My photographic world had stopped revolving around avoiding people from walking into my scene and was now obsessed with a somewhat unfamilial vertical line along a much narrower visual alley.

The funny thing is that this approach to photography is also kind of liberating. Verticality, I realized, tends to exclude the superfluous, or at least most of it. It also reduces dramatically those distracting elements that force photographers to use the cropping tool to the point of overheating. But mastering this vertical approach to composition is definitely hard work.  Shooting with a Leica rangefinder while trying to keep both eyes open as you manually focus is a challenge in and of itself, not to mention that your eyes tend to see a lot more horizontally than vertically when on a natural state (blame it on the eyebrows or something). That Mr. Gibson’s trained photographic eyes appear to live easily on that up-and-down, rangefinder plane is nothing short of remarkeable. That this verticality takes place up close in shapes and figures that most people don’t even notice, is even more astounding. After a day of attempting to grasp this whole vertical approach to composition by shooting exclusively “that way,” I certainly had a taste of the challenges and rewards associated with this visual approach. Hooked? Not sure, but I surely intend to tilt my camera from its traditional comfort zone a lot more in the future.

 

My Space, My Time

While for some people, alone time equates to loneliness, for others it is a moment of glorious solitude.
While for some people, alone time equates to unwanted loneliness, for others it is a moment of glorious solitude.
For too many, stepping away from it all does not necessarily mean disconnecting from the world at large.
For too many, stepping away from it all does not necessarily mean disconnecting from the world at large.
In our busy lives, where physical disconnection is not always possible, it is still possible to disappear into a world of thoughts.
In our busy lives, where physical disconnection is not always possible, it is still possible to disappear into a world of thoughts.
While cities are full of all sorts of external stimuli, they are also places with abundant empty streets.
While cities are full of all sorts of external stimuli, they are also places with abundant empty streets.
While not always the case, body language may have something to do with how approachable we all are at one point or another.
While not always the case, body language may have something to do with how approachable we all are at one point or another.

As I walk around all sorts of cities during my endless photo walkabouts, I can’t help but notice the sheer number of people I see alone. No, I’m not referring to the millions who go about their days moving from point A to point B as they go about their normal workdays, but rather I’m referring to those who are “really” alone, as if “I’m here all by myself” type of alone. So, unable to stop my mind from wondering what may be going through these solo souls’ minds during their personal walkabouts, I have begun to dwell on all sort of things relating to loneliness, companionship, and solitude. No, I’m not loosing my mind or plan to give up photography for psychiatry, but rather that when I’m alone out there (camera in hand), I always wonder whether my fellow lone riders are enjoying the “life less interrupted” as much as I am.

Our language has wisely sensed the two sides of being alone. It has created the word loneliness to express the pain of being alone. And it has created the word solitude to express the glory of being alone.” … Paul Tillich

From the little I can gather, it seems that people need as much time alone as they need the company of others. Call it a recharge, a moment to gather our thoughts, or whatever. And even when the line between loneliness and solitude is a blury one at best, somehow we all kind of know when we have crossed it. Ideally, that transition from one side of that undefined line to the other is a voluntary, and timely, one. That seems to be the implication of Tillich’s quote above. Choice, then, appears to be at the core of human ability to temporarily disengage, to fly alone, and to find meaning in the things around us. It is in that seemingly empty, yet rich space where we can get back to the basics of our humanity. And what emerges from that brief moment of solitude is a better person, a more fulfilled person, who’s time alone will make the company of others that much more enjoyable.

Geneva In Black & White

The views overlooking the Place de la Madeleine in Old Town Geneva are some of the most magnificent in the city.
The views overlooking the Place de la Madeleine in Old Town Geneva are some of the most magnificent in the city.
Perhaps the most famous landmark in Geneva, the Jet D'Eau started life as a relief valve for a city water pipe.
Perhaps the most famous landmark in Geneva, the Jet D’Eau started life as a relief valve for a city water pipe.
A typical street in Old Town Geneva during the early morning hours.
Even in crowded cities like Geneva, starting the day early before the crowds show up will always lead to some magnificent scenes.
A lady crosses the Rue du Soleil-Levant on her way to the Cour de Saint-Pierre, one of the greatest squares in Geneva.
A lady crosses the Rue du Soleil-Levant on her way to the Cour de Saint-Pierre, one of the greatest squares in Geneva.
Lovers kiss by the historical display at the Geneva Arsenal.
While most people in Geneva seem to be in a hurry, lovers still find time to kiss at the historical Geneva Arsenal.
The cafe restaurant immediately in front of the Geneva Arsenal Museum is a throwback to Europe in years past.
The cafe restaurant immediately in front of the Geneva Arsenal Museum is a throwback to Europe in years past.
The metal Pont de la Machine provides safe passage over the mighty Rhône River.
The metal Pont de la Machine provides safe passage over the mighty Rhône River.
The building housing the Dante Alighieri Association sits quite imposingly between Rue du Perron and Rue Otto Barblan.
The building housing the Dante Alighieri Association sits quite imposingly between Rue du Perron and Rue Otto Barblan.
Always good to find out that while people are curious about your photography, a simple thank you and a smile always go a long way.
Always good to find out that while people are curious about your photography, a simple thank you and a smile always go a long way.

My time in Switzerland came to an end at the cosmopolitan city of Geneva.  Had the weather cooperated a bit more, this would have been a great finale to a most wonderful journey to what has become one of my favorite countries in the world.  And while it does take more than three days (and hopefully, sunny days) to visit this wonderful city, its compact city centre and incredible transportation system are a great help in getting the most out of a limited visit, even in the non-stop rain.  Walking, however, is perhaps the most rewarding activity for visitors.  Venture out along the ritzy Quai du Mont-Blanc from the Pont du Mont-Blanc, with its magnificent hotels catering to a high-flying clientele, and then head on back via the more down-to-earth Rue Philippe-Plantamour (also home to some very good restaurants).  Cross the metallic Ponte de la Machine and spend some of those Swiss Francs along the shopping heaven that is the Rue du Marché (it changes names various times as it goes along).  And when you’ve had enough of people and crowds, get lost in old town and find one of those small cafés that hide along one of the many narrow, cobblestone streets.  Your feet may get tired, but you will hardly notice.  What you will surely notice, though, is that the time you’ve got in this incredible city will never be enough.  Befitting one of the most international cities in the world, there are a myriad of incredible museums, sights, and restaurants that will require more than a single visit to even scratch the surface of this city.  But don’t despair, because the good news is that no one will ever need a reason to visit Switzerland.  Great food, great people, and some of the most incredible scenery you will ever see in a lifetime.  Good enough for me, and I can’t wait to go back.

Philly Streets Are Anything But Boring

The JFK Park in central Philly has to be one of the most electing and busy spots anywhere in the world.
The JFK Park in central Philly has to be one of the most electing and busy urban spots anywhere in the world.
Worn out travelers patiently wait for their afternoon trains at the Philadelphia 30th Street Train Station.
Worn out travelers patiently wait for their afternoon trains at the Philadelphia 30th Street Train Station.
Tourists react to the human-like statutes adorning downtown theaters.
Tourists react to the human-like statutes adorning downtown theaters.
The downtown Rittenhouse Square is one of the best places in Philly for people watching.
The downtown Rittenhouse Square is one of the best places in Philly for people watching.
Sometimes what is of photographic interest lies below street level instead of above.
Sometimes what is of photographic interest lies below street level instead of above.
An early morning walk around the nearly desolate city streets is the perfect time to discover unique city characters.
An early morning walk around the nearly desolate city streets is the perfect time to discover unique city characters.
One thing that will strike any visitor to Philly is the number of people who appear to just be hanging out at city landmarks.
One thing that will strike any visitor to Philly is the number of people who appear to just be hanging out at city landmarks.

Don’t know about you, but for me, Philadelphia has to be one of the most incredible cities in America.  And while the city has a somewhat “working class” reputation with outsiders, once you get to discover it in some detail, you’ll come to realize that the city is better described as eclectic and culturally complex.  Sort of like where the rough seas meet the quiet shore kind of place.  World class museums and cultural sites sit only a few blocks away from down-to-earth wonders like the Reading Terminal Market.  Hang around the popular JFK Square for a few hours and you’ll get to see people from just about every level of society.  Wedding parties having their picture taken under the famous “LOVE” structure at JFK Square muscle endless amounts of tourists for their ten-minute spot in front of the cameras.  Walk farther afield down Walnut St. to Rittenhouse Square and Washington Square Park and you will be rewarded with some of the neatest urban spots of any city anywhere.  Add to this the fact that people actually live and interact all over the urban landscape, and you will get one of the best places for people watching and street photography on the East Coast.  Philly is definitely not your sleepy, little town where watching grass grow has been elevated to an art form.  The city is definitely alive with activity, and no matter your disposition when you get there, you won’t be able to resist becoming alive along with it.

Taking It Easy At Dupont

More than ever before, the eclectic Dupont Circle neighborhood is the place to go if you want to kick back a bit and let the problems of the world disappear.
More than ever before, the eclectic Dupont Circle neighborhood is the place to go if you want to kick back a bit and let the problems of the world disappear.
The area around Dupont Circle is home to one of the most diverse set of characters in the world.
The area around Dupont Circle is home to one of the most diverse set of characters in the world.
The chess players at Dupont Circle are nationally known and are more than willing to to give you a shot at winning for a few bucks.
The chess players at Dupont Circle are nationally known and are more than willing to to give you a shot at winning for a few bucks.

Much is written about eclectic neighborhoods around the world, but after so many years of traveling, I have to say that the Dupont Circle neighborhood in Washington, DC will give any one of them a run for their money.  No two days are alike around the Circle, and if eclectic lifestyles are what you aim to discover, the Circle has those in abundance.  Passionate environmentalists, one of the largest gay community in America, staunch advocates of Julian Assange, artists, performers, retirees, incredible restaurants, trendy bars, and nationally-ranked chess players, to name a few.  This all adds to a treasure trove of the human condition for a  photographer.  No other neighborhood in DC has this vive, and no matter how many times I visit the place with my camera, I find it impossible to get tired of it.  In fact, the place is like a never-ending play, with new scenes constantly taking their place on stage in order to keep your interest and your attention.  And you know what?  It works just right for me.

Street Photography In Krakow, Poland

The busy streets of Krakow are a street photographer dream.  Leica M 240, APO Summicron-M 75mm f/2 ASPH.
The busy streets of Krakow are a street photographer dream. Leica M 240, APO Summicron-M 75mm f/2 ASPH.
While smoking in public has diminished in Europe, plenty of people still light up like in the old days.  Leica M 240, Zeiss 35mm f/2 Biogon T* ZM.
While smoking in public has diminished in Europe, plenty of people still light up like in the old days. Leica M 240, Zeiss 35mm f/2 Biogon T* ZM.
Pilgrims from all over Poland descend on Krakow during their annual pilgrimage.  Leica M 240, Zeiss 35mm f/2 Biogon T* ZM.
Pilgrims from all over Poland descend on Krakow during their annual pilgrimage. Leica M 240, Zeiss 35mm f/2 Biogon T* ZM.
The sidewalk restaurant scene in Krakow is one of the liveliest I have ever seen anywhere in Europe.  Leica M 240, Zeiss 35mm f/2 Biogon T* ZM.
The sidewalk restaurant scene in Krakow is one of the liveliest I have ever seen anywhere in Europe. Leica M 240, Zeiss 35mm f/2 Biogon T* ZM.
Like in Saint Mark's Square in Venice, pigeons compete with people at Krakow's Market Square.  Leica M 240, Summicron-M 50mm f/2.
Like in Saint Mark’s Square in Venice, pigeons compete with people at Krakow’s Market Square. Leica M 240, Summicron-M 50mm f/2.

Thought I’d share with you some street scenes from Krakow, Poland.  For a street photographer, Krakow’s Old Town is about as close to heaven as you can get.  During the summer months its streets are filled with people at all hours of the day.  And while a great number of them are no doubt tourists, locals are also up-and-about in great numbers.  No doubt the extensive pedestrian-only zones have something to do with this, as well as the feeling of relief from the long Polish winters.  But they are out there, and to see thousands of people at sidewalk cafes and restaurants past 10:00 PM at night, is quite impressive.  The crowds are also quite photo-friendly, or put another way, they don’t scold you for taking a photo as they do in other parts of the world, which is kind of nice.  And yes, I did try to give these photographs a somewhat older-looking feeling by applying a few filters during post-processing, but I hope that didn’t detract too much from the scenes.

Where Your Feet Will Take You

We hardly ever stand still when walking around, but if you do, sometimes you are rewarded with unique sights. Leica M9, Summarit-M 90mm f/2.5.
Worker taking it all in at White House construction site for the President’s 2013 inaugural event. Leica M9, Summicron-M 28mm f/2 ASPH.
Elegant tourist about to hit the sites near the White House. Leica M9, Summarit-M 90mm f/2.5.
The irreverent Naughty Christmas event downtown DC was a non-stop caroling party for those who enjoy Christmas with a twist. Leica M9, Summicron-M 28mm f/2 ASPH.
Talk about eyes. This young man stood out from the crowd at the Naughty Christmas gathering without even trying. Leica M9, Summicron-M 50mm f/2.

When was the last time you took some time to just walk about town to see what the locals are up to?  If you haven’t done that for a while, I would suggest you give it a try, as you will be surprised with the range of human activities that occupy people besides their TV’s and overused computers.  Take for instance this past Saturday around the Penn Quarters neighborhood in Washington, DC and the White House.  Protesters manned the White House fence with signs demanding gun control laws, construction workers were working against the clock to build the reviewing stands for the President’s inaugural event, young men played concrete hockey in front of Lafayette Park, the Christmas market in front of the National Portrait Gallery was in full swing, and the incredibly colorful and jovial participants in the Naughty Christmas where caroling in front of the Natural History Museum.  Songs, laughter, and smiling faces were everywhere.  A contagious celebration of life that was as colorful as it was fun.  Amazing what your feet run into when you put them to work.