The Young Make Their Mark During Chinese New Year Celebrations

Chinese Americans kicked off local celebrations for the year 4711, known as The Year of the Horse.
Chinese Americans kicked off local celebrations for the year 4711, otherwise known as The Year of the Horse.
The colorful celebrations in the Chinatown section of Washington, DC included traditional costumes and a local parade.
The colorful celebrations in the Chinatown section of Washington, DC included traditional costumes and a local parade.
Young Chinese Americans continue to celebrate their culture while the older generation becomes a lot less visible at these events.
Young Chinese Americans continue to celebrate their culture while the older generation becomes a lot less visible at these events.
Cultural changes were readily evident at the parade, as a younger generation communicated in English while the elderly population spoke only in Chinese.
Cultural changes were readily evident at the parade, as a younger generation communicated in English while the elderly population spoke only in Chinese.
A young woman wears the so-called paddie straw hat that is so common in rural parts of Asia.
A young woman wears the so-called paddie straw hat that is so common in rural parts of Asia.
A young, vibrant, new generation of Chinese Americans are beginning to make their presence known in the Washington, DC area.
A young, vibrant, new generation of Chinese Americans are beginning to make their presence known in the Washington, DC area.

You wouldn’t know from the young, vibrant faces of a new generation of Chinese Americans that this past weekend they were actually celebrating 4711 years of Chinese cultural history.  As the Year of the Horse dawned on us all, a small but proud Chinese American community in the Penn Quarters district of Washington, DC took to the streets to celebrate the cultural traditions that the elders surely experienced back in the old country many years ago.  In spite of the fact that DC’s Chinatown is a mere shadow of what it once was (the 2010 DC census shows 24.84% of the local Asian population as ethnic Chinese), year-after-year the dwindling community goes through great efforts to keep this colorful event alive.  With the relentless encroachment of the business community in the area, it is hard to say what the future holds for these types of events, specially as the ranks of the older generation continue to dwindle and a new generation looks to the suburbs to plant their roots.  Even local newspapers have a tendency to point you in the direction of the Virginia suburbs and Maryland if authentic Chinese food is what you are after.  That’s a pity, but perhaps somewhat typical of the realities being faced by similar communities around the country.  Nevertheless, I am convinced that notwithstanding this reality, as long as we keep supporting events like these in the various ethnic communities around the country, something very precious will be preserved for future generations.  And that, my friend, would be a good thing.