Everyday Europe, In Black & White

City parks are abundant and accessible in Europe.
City parks are abundant and accessible in Europe.
The beautiful landscape invites contemplation.
The beautiful landscape invites contemplation.
Some do, some observe.
Some do, some observe.
Life extends to the streets.
Life extends to the streets.
Cafes are cultural centers.
Cafes are cultural centers.
Outdoor markets as part of everyday life.
Outdoor markets as part of everyday life.

I find very few things as satisfying as walking around neighborhoods in Europe to find out what people are really like away from the tourist spots and the hustle and bustle of city center. I’m talking about those neighborhoods that never make it to travel brochures, but which are teaming with ordinary life like the one I leave behind every time I embark on a journey. Interestingly, I travel thousands of miles, spend more money that is prudent to spend, and put my joints through grueling day walks, just to observe and experience the lives of ordinary people like myself living ordinary lives like mine. Now, I grant you that this is not everyone’s cup of tea, or that it ranks up there with what most people would choose to do with their limited time and money, but for me, this relentless pursuit of “distinctive sameness” (how’s that for confusion?) is what has fueled more than 40 years of travel around the world. You could say that I am simply fascinated by all that is the common amongst the people of the world, but at the same time different. A narrow line marking the distinction between cultures and people, but for me, a demarcation zone that has fueled the pursuit of a lifetime.

In absolute terms, human behavior and culture, are rather similar. We all eat, enjoy art, labor, love, pursue happiness, experience sadness, etc., etc, etc. We just go about it differently, and that is where my insatiable interest lies: on the “unique” ways we all experience all these common traits of humanity as a result of history, culture, and geography. The Japanese people bow deeply with tears flowing down their cheeks upon seeing someone dear to their hearts after years of separation, while the Italians hug incessantly as if trying to fuse two people into one. Same feeling, different expressions. And it’s the same wherever you look, be it in what people eat, or what they do with their free time. A beautiful river with incredible landscapes invites contemplation and romance. An industrial city replete of square, concrete buildings, perhaps not as much. Thus, the factors affecting our adopted behaviors are indeed many and varied, and there’s no better place to discover these behavioral distinctions than in the neighborhoods where people disarmingly engage in them without a care in the world. In the process, I learn a lot about them, and without a doubt, a little about myself.

City Hopping In Europe

Prague will always be at the top of everyone's favorite cities in Europe.
Prague will always be at the top of everyone’s favorite cities in Europe.
The historical importance of Vienna is evidenced in its majestic buildings.
The historical importance of Vienna is evidenced in its majestic buildings.
Old Town Hannover transports you to another era.
Old Town Hannover transports you to another era.
Sitting by the Elbe River, Dresden lives up to its historical grandeur.
Sitting by the Elbe River, Dresden lives up to its historical grandeur.
In Berlin's Mitte, old and new coexist as if they had ever been there.
In Berlin’s Mitte, old and new coexist as if they had ever been there.

There are some things you just can’t have enough in life. For me, that’s traveling through Europe. That is because no matter how much I visit that continent, there’s something new to discover and experience. The fact that you can find a completely different language and culture by just driving the equivalent of crossing an US state line, just adds to the experience every time. But today’s Europe is not the same as the one I experienced during the days of the Cold War and before globalization. Today, it is a much-changed cultural landscape, where the old, great architecture is still there, but goods and services are pretty much the same as in any US major city. Of course, I’m referring to the large cities in the continent, because once you get to the countryside, the Europe of your imagination is still hanging on to culture and mores. Of course, this is not to say that the large cities have lost all manners of cultural identity (because they have not), but rather that the forces of globalization are a lot more evident in the great capitals than anywhere else in the continent.

But whatever the changed landscape, return to Europe I must. And just like every time before, what I found was quite incredible and left me (as always before) wanting to return as soon as possible. In true “slow travel” mode, I once more discovered that slowing down, venturing off-the-beaten-path at odd hours of the day, and taking time to absorb everything around me, made all the difference in the world. From the royal architecture of Vienna, to the cobblestone streets and towers of Prague, it is all fascinating to me. The quiet, precious moments at daybreak, when the majestic, war-scared buildings of Dresden were drenched in the lazy, yellow light of a new day ricocheting off the mighty Elbe, inevitably transported you to another century long the stuff of history books. And then, there were the Royal Gardens of Herrenhausen in Hannover. You could spend an entire day enjoying what has to be one of the great, and most romantic gardens of the world. New and old, coexisting for centuries. In Berlin while wrapping up this never-long-enough European tour, I couldn’t help but think of the incredible talent that centuries past created such works of beauty, and the incredible hatred that so often tried to destroy them in equal time. Human frailty and the human spirit, battling it out throughout history. We can only hope that the spirit continues to help preserve such gems for future generations.

Vienna Never Fails To Charm

The Belvedere Palace, with its magnificent collection of Gustav Klimt's paints cannot be missed in Vienna.   Leica M 240, Summicron-M 28mm f/2 ASPH.
The Belvedere Palace, with its magnificent collection of Gustav Klimt’s paints cannot be missed in Vienna. Leica M 240, Summicron-M 28mm f/2 ASPH.
The palace grounds behind Michaeleplatz are only people-free in the early morning hours.  Leica M 240, Summicron-M 28mm f/2 ASPH.
The palace grounds behind Michaeleplatz are only people-free in the early morning hours. Leica M 240, Summicron-M 28mm f/2 ASPH.
Friendly faces make Vienna just as attractive as the many palaces there.  Leica M 240, Summicron-M 50mm f/2.
Friendly faces make Vienna just as attractive as the many palaces there. Leica M 240, Summicron-M 50mm f/2.
The outside hall of the secluded Minoritenkirche in Vienna is a study in light.  Leica M 240, Summicron-M 50mm f/2.
The outside hall of the secluded Minoritenkirche in Vienna is a study in light. Leica M 240, Summicron-M 50mm f/2.

Every time I visit Vienna, Austria, I am simply taken by its sheer beauty and imposing majesty.  It is a magnificent city, even when a heatwave is blanketing the city and everyone seemed to be wilting from the heat.  But while the constant 90+ degree heat made parts of the day unbearable, the morning and evenings when the light is best, still saved the photographic day.

This time around in Vienna I stayed away from the museums and palaces and concentrated on trying to find the true Viennese.  Granted that I’m not quite sure what that is, but I was committed to finding it nonetheless.  This proved harder than I thought, as it became readily apparent that in this world of globalized culture and products, that uniqueness that was Europe is becoming harder to find in the great European cities.  People dress the same as those we left behind back home, and with the exception of some food items, we all eat pretty much the same things too (although I must admit that no one in the whole world can make croissants like the Viennese, not even the French).

But having said that, I still can’t help but be charmed by this great city.  From the Belvedere Palace with its panoramic views of the city to the museum sector downtown, Vienna is about palatial scale.  Drivers politely wave you across the street while they wait and locals patiently watch the street crossing signals before making their move.  For a city with millions of visitors each year, the city center is incredible clean and a feeling of orderliness seems to prevail in everything locals do (or at least that’s how it feels for those of us coming from other parts of the world).  And while I will have a little more to say about Vienna in the coming days, my initial feeling on this fourth visit to the city is the same as when I first laid eyes on it many years ago: simple fascination.